Why Dental Visits Are Important to You and Your Baby

Taking care of your teeth while pregnant is essential for your gums and health. During pregnancy, the hormonal imbalance can increase your risk of gum disease, which can be detrimental to your baby’s development. Here are a few ways Dr. Chris Mott suggests to take care of your teeth before, during, and after your pregnancy, as well as how you can take care of your little one’s first tooth.

Maintaining Oral Health Before Pregnancy

800-6217-5Seeing a dentist before you are pregnant allows you to make sure everything is in order with your gums and teeth. Your teeth can be professionally cleaned, your gum tissue can be examined, and most importantly, any oral problems that you may have can be treated.

If you suddenly have to get a dental surgery done while pregnant, the aesthetic may harm the baby. If you catch it before, you can have it removed without worry of harming your child. This is why the majority of moms-to-be should visit their dentist before they plan to get pregnant.

Visiting Your Dentist During Pregnancy

Image of pregnant woman touching her belly with handsDental Procedures

It is extremely important that you tell your dentist that you’re pregnant so that he can be more aware of any pregnancy-related problems that may arise. Urgent dental procedures can be done while pregnant; however, most dentists agree that if the procedure can wait until after delivery, to do schedule the procedure after delivery.

Be sure to ask your OBGYN about any worries you may have with an urgent or elective dental procedure to see if they have any special instructions or additional information.

Medications

Let your dentist know what medications you are taking, including your type of Prenatal Vitamin. Your local dentist can base their oral procedures and examinations around your medication in case any side effects may occur.

X-Rays

Oral x-rays can be done during pregnancy, as your dentist will ensure to safeguard you and your baby from any harmful x-rays. If you are due for a dental x-ray, be sure to let your dentist or hygienist know that you are pregnant so they can prepare for your visit.

Dental Visits

It’s important that you don’t skip a dental appointment. Regular gum exams are very important due to the hormone changes in your body that can lead to gum disease. Make sure to look out for any gum tenderness, bleeding or swelling. If any of these issues occur, let Dr. Chris Mott know as soon as possible.

Routine Dental Hygiene

Make sure you brush your teeth with toothpaste and mouthwash twice a day to keep up with good oral hygiene. If morning sickness stops you from brushing, get a bland-tasting toothpaste, and use a mouth rinse if you get frequent bouts of vomiting.

Dental Hygiene After Pregnancy

Mom’s Orhappy mom and daughter outdooral Health

After you have had your baby, you should be able to resume dental appointments as they were before. Remember to brush twice a day, and have a good balanced diet. If you’ve experienced any gum problems throughout your pregnancy, see your dentist as soon as you can to have your mouth and gums examined, and your oral health reevaluated.

Baby’s Oral Health

If you’re a first-time mom, taking care of your baby’s mouth and teeth may prove tricky. But in reality, it isn’t that difficult at all. In fact, you can look after your baby’s gums right away by wiping down their gums before bed and after every feeding.

Teething is when your baby starts growing their first teeth. This process is very uncomfortable for your child, so try to make it as comfortable as possible. The most common symptoms of teething are:

  • Crying
  • Drooling
  • Swollen gums
  • A slightly raised temperature

To ease the teething pain of your baby, you can try a few things:

  • Buy teething toys that soothe your child’s teeth and gums.
  • Rub your child’s gums.
  • Use pediatrician or pediatric dentist recommended pain relievers. Do NOT give your baby regular pain relievers such as Aspirin or Motrin.

Your child should start to see the dentist around the ages of 1-2, regardless of the number of teeth they currently have. By doing so your dentist can advise you about tooth care, teething, fluoride and thumb sucking early on.

We know pregnancy is hard enough as it is. If you are worried about your dental health while pregnant, give our office a call to have Dr. Chris Mott answer your questions and give you peace of mind.




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