Need a Root Canal? Here’s What You Can Expect

Toothaches can be quite uncomfortable. Nobody can deny this. The best way to deal with dental pain is to prevent it from occurring in the first place. Regular checkups and cleanings with Dr. Mott can help keep your teeth and gums clean, healthy, and pain-free. We realize, however, that sometimes things happen and tooth pain is inevitable.

There are times when a root canal is the best possible course of treatment for particular dental ailments. Root canals have a history of being one of the most vilified dental procedures of all-time. There are so many joke and stories swirling around about root canals that people tend to avoid them altogether unless their dental issues prove so excruciating that they are forced to face their fears.

But, are root canals really so scary? Is there any truth to the stories people tell about them? We’re here today to solve that mystery and put your mind at ease once and for all concerning root canals. Let’s get started…

Before building up huge amounts of anxiety about whether or not you need a root canal, let’s discuss some of the times dentists opt to perform this procedure.

Reasons You May Need a Root Canal

Root canals become necessary when the natural cavity surrounded by pulp within one’s tooth where the nerve resides becomes infected. When a bacterial infection attacks this cavity, the bacteria in question produce a gas that exerts pressure upon the tooth’s nerve. It is because of this pressure that pain manifests.

Some people have been known to struggle with additional symptoms such swelling of the face and neck. The excruciating pain resulting from these infections isn’t always immediate. Most people first struggle with mild levels of discomfort which manifest whenever they are eating or drinking.

Rather than waiting for the pain to emerge, such problems can be identified using an X-ray, at which point you could come in to see Dr. Mott and seek treatment.

What Exactly is a Root Canal?

The term refers to a dental procedure during which the nerve of a tooth (and the pulp surrounding it) are removed. As scary as it may sound, this procedure will not affect the health of your tooth. The nerve and the pulp in your cavity only exist to fulfill sensory purposes. This nerve is the reason you can feel hot and cold temperatures around your teeth. Removing the nerve will do little to affect the health of your tooth.

The Procedure

Root canals are relatively straightforward procedures. Before one is performed, an X-ray must be carried out to identify the problem and determine the extent of the damage. Once the actual procedure begins, the area around the tooth in question is numbed.

A hole is then drilled into the tooth, providing access to the nerve and pulp which is then removed, along with any decayed tissue. The cavity of the tooth is thoroughly cleaned and then sealed. It is that simple.

Dr Mott

Dr Chris Mott

Sometimes, the root canal cannot be completed on the same day, in which case the hole in the tooth is covered using temporary filling until the next appointment.
Root canals are almost always a success and are generally painless. People who complain about the pain of a root canal are usually talking about the discomfort they were dealing with before they sought the dental care to relieve the pain. When performed by an experienced professional such as Dr. Mott, root canals will relieve pain and restore your mouth to its original pain-free condition.

Dr. Chris A. Mott is a highly-experienced and well-respected dentist serving the Shreveport and Bossier areas. If you feel you may be in need of a root canal or just need a cleaning or checkup, please feel free to call our office and set up an appointment. We would love to welcome you into the Mott dental family.

Is This The End of Root Canals?

Dentistry’s most horrifying treatment, the root canal, is soon to be long forgotten thanks to radical new stem cell therapy. Researchers have said that this new tooth-filling method will cause teeth to repair and even regenerate. This approach will significantly impact millions of people with dental issues every year, providing dental fillings that will help heal teeth injured by dental surgery or disease.

Wyss Institute of Harvard University
Researchers on dental care from the Wyss Institute of Harvard University and the University of Nottingham have come up with a therapeutic, light-curable, synthetic biomaterial. They are supposed to allow native dental stem cells from teeth to repair and regenerate dentin. Research shows that the dental fillings currently common in dentistry are deadly to cells and, therefore, are incompatible with the pulp tissue inside the tooth. For now, the scientists involved in this study have been exceptionally recognized for their soon-to-be huge discovery—even the Royal Society of Chemistry is awarding them.

Still Testing….
For many of us, this is, indeed, news to make us smile, but not so fast. At this point, cell cultures are still being tested in labs and will soon be tested on rodents. The good news is that the stem cells could very well be the solution to ending root canals; however, unfortunately, it’s still unknown when this procedure could be applied to humans, and it could take years of testing and research for it to be introduced into modern dentist’s’ practice. However, for now, the research is successful, and it’s just a matter of time before this becomes a reality.

Why Is the New Research So Important?
As said earlier, the materials currently used in dental care to fill a patient’s tooth normally have content that is harmful to oral cells. With this new scientific discovery, scientists say they are hopeful they will put an end to that. They are also hopeful that this technique will recreate parts of a patient’s tooth in a safe and a natural way. They are also confident the use of stem cells could end the painful, loud, anxiety-causing drilling method of doing root canals.

Imagine what this could do. More and more people may actually want to be checked and treated since this new method will be painless and, most importantly, will not let impurities in your mouth. Business will also be good for dentists.

So, should we still be treated with traditional root canals until this procedure is released?

While we wait for this new discovery procedure to be made publicly available to treat humans, there is still hope. Currently, lasers are used in root canal therapy while using high pressure plus water in getting rid of dead or infected oral tissues and infections. With this new awaited method, those dreadful thoughts we always get when planning to see a dentist will be gone.

If you have any questions or concerns about your family’s dental care, give Dr. Mott a call. We can schedule a cleaning or checkup for you and answer any questions you may have.